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WHAT’S THE STORY: LIFE STYLE NARRATIVES STUDY GROUP (Affiliate of NASP)
Sunday, August 02, 2020, 1:00 PM CST
Category: Events

WHAT’S THE STORY: LIFE STYLE NARRATIVES STUDY GROUP

 

(An affiliate of the North American Society of Adlerian Psychology/NASAP)

 

Zoom meeting August 2, 2000, 1:00 p.m., Central (Chicago) Time

 

Subject: “Early Recollections of Twins”

 

WE NOW HAVE A WEBSITE!

 

https://www.whatsthestory.online/

 

CHECK US OUT!

 

We’re a book club with a twist!

 

RSVP so we can email you the fascinating “reading”!

 

What’s the Story?”: Life Style Narratives Study Group “strings together” a person’s Early Recollections or perceived important memories – those short autobiographical sketches that largely reflect a person’s personality or “movement through life” – into a kind of short story.  The group then adapts and applies literary interpretive methods used by educational organizations such as The Great Books Foundation, which promote better comprehension of a text, to Life Style interpretation.  We are not a therapy group, but a book club with a twist!

 

Topic: What's the story- Twin Lifestyle narratives
Time: Aug 2, 2020 01:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada); meeting may last up to 1 ½ hours

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https://tcsedsystem.zoom.us/j/97131644742

Meeting ID: 971 3164 4742
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Meeting ID: 971 3164 4742
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From our website: 

What’s the Story was inspired by the work of pioneering personality theorist Alfred Adler and the exercises that writers’ workshops conduct to “get the creative juices flowing”:  

Alfred Adler (1870 – 1937) believed that a person’s personality, which he called Life Style, could be assessed via the “stories” – the memories or early recollections – that a person easily, and often, recalls. (Adler’s ideas influenced social psychology and cognitive-behavioral psychology.)   

 Writers workshops, particularly creative writing workshops, emphasize “writing about what you know.” Popular writing exercises involve jotting down memories or specific incidents.  Chicago’s “Clothesline School of Fiction,” for example, emphasized “stringing together” memories because the incidents, themes reflected, and people remembered in them often were similar and, thus, could form the foundation of a larger literary piece. 

Each “reading” that we approach and interpret – as a book club-style group – is comprised of that person’s (the “author’s”) Family Constellation and Early Recollections:

The Family Constellation provides a kind of “Cast of Characters.”  It is really just brief descriptions of self (the author, or “I” of the story/ies or memories – the main character/”hero”) and family members.  These descriptions show not only the influences on the main character, but give us – the readers! – an idea of how that person responds to others.  (A simple way to understand the Family Constellation is to consider birth order – or  one’s position with regard to others: that is, does a character resemble a “bossy oldest” or a “dethroned oldest” or a “spoiled youngest” or an “ignored middle,” “the favorite son,” “the competitive second,” “the rebel,” the drop out,” etc.). 

 The Early Recollections (ERs) are the author’s/main character’s important or “guiding” memories.  (These recollections are called “guiding” because, being the most easily recalled, they generally reflect what the author thinks of self, world, and others; they can reflect, for example, “lessons learned” or how the person has been “moving” through life.)  The handful of memories that are asked for are strung together, composing a kind of short story that involves challenges and characters’ attempts to overcome or solve them …

We interpret the material or reading as a group, raising opened-ended questions (often referred to as Socratic-type questions) to get us started.  A question may even be as simple as “what don’t you understand?”, and then inviting participants to find clues or patterns within the text to help in the inquiry or answering. 

 What’s the Story: Life Style Narratives Study Group – a book club with a twist.

Les White

[email protected]

WATCH THIS SPACE

September 20 meeting: book party for Aimee Daramus on Bipolar Disorder;

a reading of the recollections of an individuals diagnosed with Bipolar will be included

 

Contact: [email protected]